Can a Cheater Change


Siemens2022/07/01 22:47
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But if all is going well, and you're both deeply committed to each other's well-being, past infidelity does not need to end a relationship. Because "once a cheater, always a cheater" is just a phrase, and if you and your partner are dedicated to nurturing your healthy relationship, it doesn't need to be your reality.

Can a Cheater Change

Trusting that it won't happen again may be a struggle if your partner has cheated before, either in your relationship or a past one. In this case, it's important to understand that you are the one controlling your narrative. This narrative is "only as true as you want it to be," and insecurities could lead to conflict and potentially even the end of the relationship.

Focus on answers to questions that may help you feel better about the state of your relationship and its future: "How much remorse do they feel? Do they take responsibility for their actions? Have they forgiven themselves? What have they learned about themselves as a result of the cheating? How do they define fidelity? How committed are they to practicing fidelity? What are the things they do now to ensure they stay in their integrity?"

Make sure to go about this process with love, not anger or fear, at the forefront. Your fear is understandable, but being accusatory will likely put your partner on the defensive and keep you from getting the reassurance you need. As you listen to the answers, she says to look for signs about how relationally self-aware your partner is.

Relational self-awareness is defined as an ongoing curious and compassionate relationship with yourself that creates the foundation for a happy and healthy intimate relationship.

Relational self-awareness is key to deciphering the answer to whether a cheater can change. Relationally self-aware people take responsibility for their actions and learn lessons from mistakes. A story of infidelity from someone who is relationally self-aware might then look something like this: "I cheated in my last relationship. When the infidelity came to light, I was deeply ashamed and confused about my behavior, so I started therapy and began to understand why I was vulnerable to betraying my partner's trust. I recognize now that I was acting out an old dynamic. I am committed to living differently now."

On the other hand, people who lack relational self-awareness may fail to mention infidelity until it comes to light in another way. They might place blame elsewhere or demonstrate they've learned nothing. That story may look like this: "I cheated in my last relationship. My ex was crazy. I was miserable. There's nothing to say about it beyond that. I'm fine. We'll be fine. Don't worry about it."

If your partner lacks relational self-awareness or comes across as dismissive, heed caution. There is a greater likelihood that a cheater will not cheat again if they do the work to discover why they cheated, recognize the gravity of their actions, and then take the responsibility and time to heal that part of themselves. If the person still blames the ex or failed to evaluate the reason they thought another person was a better answer than their partner, there is a strong possibility they will cheat again.

And if you know your partner has a history of infidelity, but you have no reason to believe any act of cheating has occurred during your relationship? You might be able to seek solace in your lived experience of your partner's fidelity. And if or when you do feel bothered or triggered by a certain action—like if your partner's been getting home super late or if they've been unresponsive to texts and calls during certain windows of time—be open about how these acts make you feel.

Work with your partner to create a vision for how the two of you will practice healthy boundaries. Maybe that means they call if they will be late; whatever it is, decide together.

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