BOOK 📚 REVIEWS.


Ayesha Raza2021/12/26 20:38
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A book review is a form of literary criticism in which a book is merely described or analyzed based on content, style, and merit. A book review may be a primary source, opinion piece, summary review or scholarly review.

BOOK 📚 REVIEWS.

BOOK 📚 REVIEWS.

Kevin Trudeau, author of the number-one New York Times best-selling “Natural Cures ‘They’ Don’t Want You To Know About,” has written his second important book. Like his first groundbreaking publication-which sold more than 4.5 million copies-Trudeau’s new book exposes what the author says are ways food and drug companies hide the fact that their products cause disease.


Called “More Natural ‘Cures’ Revealed: Previously Censored Brand Name Products That Cure Disease” (Alliance Publishing, $24.95), the new book features material the Federal Trade Commission actually censored from the first book, as well as new eye-opening information.


The book says the FDA and FTC do not protect consumers, but instead protect the profits of multinational corporations. These types of allegations have earned Trudeau the dubious honor of being called the most daring corporate and government whistleblower of all time. In fact, he has risked potential criminal prosecution by writing his new book.


He answers his critics by sharing story after story about individuals who are using non-drug and nonsurgical, natural methods for their illnesses and diseases. This book picks up where his first book left off:


• The 20 most commonly asked questions Trudeau received from his first book are explained in detail.


• Specific clinics and licensed health care practitioners from around the world are listed with complete contact information.


• 101 specific diseases are listed with the specific brand names that Trudeau believes will prevent, treat or cure the condition.

Wooffer is a collection of thirty-three short animal-adventure children stories originally written by Betty Fasig for her family. The center character is Wooffer, a hairy dachshund puppy that “mom”, the author, receives as a surprise Xmas gift from her fun-loving family.


A host of animals grace the pages of Wooffer, including Old Agnes the mouse, thoughtful and protective Margaret the hen, Marygrey the pregnant rabbit, a proud and endearing peacock named Cho Lee who loves to strut his stuff and falls in love with a quail, and best friends Ibie the Ibis and Maudie the horse.


The stories are thoughtfully placed in chronological order, right down to the season. It even includes a Xmas story! This is a book about a puppy that changes the opinions of those around him, wins hearts and becomes a reliable, heroic friend. Wooffer earns respect from all the animals for miles around and becomes a bit of a legend by the time he grows up.


Generally warm, fun and light-hearted, Wooffer also tackles real-life issues from moving, loneliness, gaining respect, discerning truth from what one is told, getting lost, overcoming bullies and more.


Having spent a few years on a farm in my youth, I see germs of truth in the animal relationships and can verify the strange and wonderful bonds that happen between species. The epilogue provides a nice closure by revealing how all the animals still return to the same area annually and spend time with Wooffer and his friends discussing the old times and having new adventures.


Inserted occasionally are several adorable amateur drawings of life and adventures on the farm that are sure to entertain children. The cover is a photograph of the inspiration for the main character – the author’s dog – which gives a more realistic feel to the book than a characterization or drawing could have done.


The book’s underlying theme is that no matter how small a person may think they are, or how small of a thing they may do – they can make a difference to the lives of those around them. And this is an encouraging thought.


Wooffer is an excellent book for bedtime stories, but will be best enjoyed when reading to groups of children. Written in such a way that the reader can easily characterize the animals and situations with their voice, the book is sure to bring giggles of joy to groups of children. As such, I think Wooffer would be an excellent addition to the bookshelves of libraries, schools, daycare centers and the like.

Scott Underhill takes readers on a stimulating, emotional ride in his book The Cranberry Bog, an environmental suspense novel. Environment Engineer, Jeff Ridge works for the Environment Protection Agency. He and his co-worker, Tara Clemens, are walking on eggshells around an unusual assignment after being called into investigate tainted water at a Bed and Breakfast owned by Joshua and Debra Klickman. Jeff and Tara are quickly exposed to the ‘small town syndrome’ – everyone knows everyone else’s business.


Meanwhile, Jeff is feeling ousted by his superiors who choose to compromise the Sheziou Report. Heated tempers and flared verbal exchanges are not enough to deter Jeff from his ideals. When the criminals resort to beatings and persecution, Jeff is only fueled by the knowledge that he is on to something big. The mysterious helper who drops off notes and envelopes of evidence leads Jeff to clues that egg him on to seek the truth.


Attraction to Lydia Kittle, the heiress of Kittle Manufacturing, contradicts his nearly fanatic feelings towards big business, which has often turned its back on the environment. Jeff’s tragic tale of loss froze his heart, but the sight of Lydia gives him the strength to thaw and except love again.


I really enjoyed reading this novel, which seemingly has it all. Environmental pollution, corrupt officials, politicians and companies lead to thrilling chase scenes and to cold-blooded murder. It is a moving romance with a glorious ‘David against Goliath’ theme that will have you cheering for the underdog. Of course, the focus on the environment is very appealing to me as I deeply cherish, and work towards, the health of the planet.


I highly recommend Scott Underhill’s novel, The Cranberry Bog – and I look forward to reading his other novel, Give a Little!


Instead of Roses and Rings is a wonderful tale of love and healing for two men in one university. This is not a “smut” romance – you will not find erotic scenes in this tender, insiders’ view into the life of men who prefer the company of men.


Chris unknowingly haunts Alexis from the moment they meet. Alexis sees things that lead him to believe that Chris has the gift of sight and this intrigues him – yet Alexis also fears an eerie paranormal connection between Chris’s features and an old lover who died in the past.


Innocent of all of this, Chris clumsily struggles to understand his sexuality and the new lifestyle without the aide of having someone there to explain things to him or share his fears with. He selflessly and without pride, adores Alexis with such intensity that it almost destroys them both – yet it ends up being their very salvation.


Torn between emotional scars from the past and society’s expectations, they attempt to maintain composure while dealing with these new and intense feelings. Leering and biased adversaries seem to lurk around every corner, yet good-hearted friends give them the strength and the council to get beyond misunderstandings and face the strong, confusing emotions that come with the beginnings of love. These two men are from the same world, but have come from opposite ends of the spectrum – love soon proves to be blind to all such boundaries.


I would be remiss as a reviewer if I did not mention the myriad of grammatical errors in this book. Sentences were occasionally missing entire words or used the wrong word (i.e. hear instead of here) and the author’s use of incorrect punctuation brought down the quality of my journey in this tale as a reader.


The dream sequences were some of the most unique that I have read. The author decided to refrain from any punctuation of any kind, which once accustomed to, actually brings a real sense of the speed and flashing events that people experience in dreams.

We all know a Weasel. You know, that person that threatens to take down your organization by using every sleazy tactic in the book to advance their careers regardless of how it effects others. Warriors, Workers, Whiners, and Weasels: The 4 Personality Types in Business and How to Manage Them to Your Advantage by entrepreneur Tim O’Leary takes a refreshing look at the different personalities we encounter and how to handle them.


The premise of the book is that essentially everyone fits into one of four personality groups – Warrior, Worker, Whiner, or Weasel. O’Leary defines each as the following:


Warriors, who confront change, see possibilities, innovate and manage to win!


Workers, who deal with the ups, downs and challenges of everyday corporate life dependably, and who can reliably implement the change and direction established by the Warriors.


Whiners, who get through life by complaining about everything they do, who profess negativism and dissatisfaction wherever they go, and blaming others for their own shortcomings.


Weasels, who lurk everywhere and threaten your career and life-goals through their own deception and insecurity and who spread these feelings quickly throughout the organization.


The book is designed to help you recognize what group you fit into, give you the necessary tools to get to the group you want to be in, and learn how to effectively deal with people in each group. The book really does a great job of forcing you to truthfully analyze yourself. O’Leary warns you that you might not like what you find, but also is quick to point reinforce that you are in control and that you can make the changes in your life to fit into the group that you desire.


Even more interesting (and fun) is visualizing the people you know and placing them into their appropriate categories. We have all encountered a Whiner or Weasel and it helps to know what makes them tick and how to effectively deal with them so that they don’t negatively impact your life. O’Leary uses the analogy to the common cold – you can’t completely eliminate Weasels from your life but you can take precautions to limit the frequency in which they enter your life and the damage that they do while they’re a part of it.


O’Leary uses a mixes light-hearted humor with a fiercely intense attitude to combine a business book and a self-help book in an exciting fashion. One chapter might focus on a self-analysis, the next might be about personal stories from O’Leary’s experiences, and the next about management. The book is well over 200 pages but reads at the speed of a book that’s half that. I often found myself reading several chapters in a sitting, which is a testament to the writers’ ability to hold readers interest. If there’s a downside (and it’s not much of one), it’s that O’Leary is so brutally honest that it may rub some people wrong, especially those who fall into the Whiner and Weasel groups.


Warriors, Workers, Whiners, and Weasels: The 4 Personality Types in Business and How to Manage Them to Your Advantage by Tim O’Leary is a must read for every entrepreneur, business owner, manager, and worker wishing to learn more about themselves, take advantage of their best traits, and protect themselves from those who could sabotage their career.

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