Ayesha Raza2021/12/17 18:14
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An all-terrain vehicle (ATV) is defined as a motorized off-highway vehicle designed to travel on four low-pressure or non-pneumatic tires, having a seat designed to be straddled by the operator and handlebars for steering control.

ATV

ATV

The Best ATV Trails: One Man’s Trash is Another Man’s Treasure


Next time you hear about a great riding spot, you might want to ask a few questions before you pack up to go ride there. Although all ATV’s are designed for fun, they aren’t all set up for having fun on the same terrain, and a trail that is great for some people might be a complete bore or be impassable for others.


Twenty years ago most ATV’s were fairly similar. Three wheels were a lot more common than four, and they all had a utilitarian feel to them. Today there is a huge variety of ATV’s that are specifically designed to meet the needs of nearly any rider. Most ATV’s have become very specialized and are designed for mud, rocks, work, or just plain speed. However, because ATV’s are so specialized, certain trails are much more suited to different types of ATV’s. ATV’s fall into two categories, sport and utility, and each type of ATV performs extremely well in a certain conditions.


For rock crawling and other extremely rough terrain, a large four wheel drive utility quad is the best, but skid plates are highly recommended. Four wheel drive is crucial for rock crawls since it’s not uncommon to get a front or back wheel off the ground in order to get from one rock to another. Although it is possible to prod a two wheel drive sport bike over some crazy rocks, you’d better take the right line through the rocks the first time since most sport bikes don’t have a reverse. The suspension setups in sport bikes also make them much more difficult to get across big rocks; this is because the suspension is much more rigid, and many of them lack independent suspension. In many utility quads, it seems like the tires reach down and grab the rocks.


When it comes to mud pits, the utility quads, especially those with four wheel drive are right at home. The extra weight of these monsters, along with locking differentials, let the tires sling anything out of the way that it can’t grab onto. Sport bikes can be plenty of fun in the mud, but they are not the first choice for deep mud holes. Anytime you are crossing mud, speed is your friend, especially if you’re on a sport bike designed for speed and acceleration, not the low end torque need to push through a wall of mud and water. However, stopping any quad in the middle of a mud pit, four wheel drive or not, can mean getting out the tow cable or winch.


Another unexpected trail obstacle that can mean trouble is sand, especially the type of sand that is found close to creek beds. Typically you can get some decent traction on dunes, but unpacked sand is a problem for most quads, unless handled properly. In loose sand, a sport bike has the advantage over heavy utility quad. A sport bike’s light weight allows it to keep moving over sand, while most utility bikes are designed to dig deeper into terrain to get traction. Regardless of what kind of quad you have, speed is the best way to overcome sand without getting stuck.


The biggest issue that comes up when talking about great riding trails is what makes that trail great. Some people will say that mostly level trails with a few hills and ditches are great riding; they just want to get away from everything and enjoy the great outdoors for a few hours. Although there are many people that enjoy this type of ATV ride, it just won’t cut it if you’re in the mood to sling some mud, catch some air, or crawl up bluffs. Whatever kind of riding you enjoy, you might be very disappointed if you unload at a spot and find that the terrain brings out your quad’s weaknesses instead of its strengths.

Not all of us can afford a brand new 2007 ATV with all the bells and whistles. As with cars or motorcycles or any large vehicle for recreation or pleasure, we sometimes have to start out with buying second hand. Of course there’s nothing wrong with purchasing a used car, bike or ATV. If you are going to buy used, you have to know what to look for, especially with a vehicle such as an ATV where you know that there is a chance the previous owner might have given the ATV some serious abuse on the trails. Before you begin to cruise the classifieds you have a couple of decisions to make. Who is the ATV for? An ATV for an adult is made differently than one made for a child. Do you want the ATV for purely recreational purposes? Do you want to race or just enjoy some leisurely off-roading with your family? Do you want to use the ATV as a utility vehicle?


The best place to start if you have never purchased an ATV before would be at a local dealership. You may not be able to afford one off the showroom floor, but you can still go look and pick the dealer’s brain for information. At the dealership you can ‘test’ the different classes of ATVs. Sit on a few to see how they fit, each ATV will be different and you might find that some are more comfortable than others. Even though you are trying newer models, there really won’t be too much of a difference between them and the older versions.


After getting all the information you can from the dealership, you will have some idea of what make and model you will be looking for in a used ATV. While you’re at the dealership also check to see if they have a bulletin board for other ATV resources. Sometimes if you contact a club or other organization they may be able to put you in touch with people who have ATV’s to sell. Classified ads and specialized classified magazines like you see for cars or motorcycles will also be a valuable resource. And of course the number one source for finding used vehicles is the internet. Places like eBay will no doubt have a lot to offer, the only problem with that is, unless the seller is in your area, you have no way to view the ATV up close.


When you find the ATV you want to purchase, definitely go to check it out personally. When you see the ATV for the first time, make note of the condition of the plastic on the fenders. The overall outward appearance of the ATV will give you a pretty good clue as to how hard the previous owner treated the vehicle. If the fenders or other plastic parts are cracked and ruined you can bet that you’re going to have to replace them and replacement parts and accessories are expensive. You have to decide how much you are willing to invest in refurbishing the ATV if parts do need replacing. Check the condition of the seat for any rips or tears. Again, a ripped seat isn’t a big deal and is totally replaceable, but do you want to spend the extra money to do that?


The next part of the inspection will take some work. You will want to lift the front end of the ATV up to inspect the undercarriage. With the ATV lifted, closely inspect the frame for any damage. Make sure there are no cracks or dents in the frame or any of the connecting welds Note any areas that might have rust and check them for cracks too. Check the handlebars for any loose play and do the same to each wheel. Loose wheels could indicate worn wheel bearings or damaged ball joints. Oil, breaks and the air filter and air box should also be checked. Ask the owner if they have any records regarding oil changes and maintenance. Some owners might have an owner’s manual that they can pass on to you. Take the ATV for a test drive too if you can to see how it handles.


Lastly, if a title is required in your state ask the owner if they have the title and if it is clear. Most states require a bill of sale with the VIN (vehicle identification number) on it. Whether your state requires a bill of sale or not, it is always a good idea to have one to protect both you and the former owner incase a dispute crops up. Be aware that in most cases you are buying the ATV “as is”, which means the previous owner is not responsible for any problems you might find with the vehicle after you have purchased it and brought it home.

I’ve found the best ATV trail! You have to try it!” How many times have you heard that statement from one of your ATV-loving friends and then rushed out to have a terrific ATV riding excursion, only to find that you’re not all that enthralled by a trail that another four-wheeling enthusiast has deemed “awesome”?


Since you are an individual with a definite personality and not a robot without preferences, what leaves you breathless in terms of an ATV trail might not raise the pulse or even eyebrow of another ATV rider and vice versa. Hence, we’ve put together the following guide to help you figure out the perfect ATV trail for you.


If you’re someone who likes speed and want to feel the wind rushing past you, then you’ll probably like an ATV trail that’s flat and fast.


Flat and fast trails are best described as terrain that allows you to gun your ATV’s motor and quickly get from one point to the next. Your best bet is to find a low-lying area, as mountainous regions rarely have long stretches that include no twists or turns. ATV trails in the middle states of America lend themselves to this kind of speedy ATV riding, as they are notoriously level and have an attractive, earthy quality.


If you’re a four-wheel rider who loves the thrill of wicked turns, then you should consider an ATV trail that’s twisting and wild.


You can hoot and holler along an ATV path that winds its way through a wooded area or along a stream bed. Do your best to avoid extremely rocky areas as they can be dangerous, but don’t be afraid of taking on some of the smaller hills and roaring your ATV around some of the more adventurous terrain.


If you’re an enthusiast who loves steep climbing followed by hair-raising descents, you might enjoy an ATV trail that’s up and down.


Head to the mountains, my friend! In the mountains, you will find exactly what you’re searching for in terms of rollercoaster-like ATV adventures! Not only will you be able to test your ATV’s moxie on some serious grades, but you’ll also be able to whiz down scenic mountainsides. Remember to keep your speed in check, though; up and down terrain is only safe when you keep a cool head and a conservative pace.


If you’re a laid-back person who just enjoys a little bit of everything, why not try an ATV trail that’s a pleasure potpourri?


The “pleasure potpourri” is ideal for the ATV trail rider who can’t make up his or her mind as to what the “perfect” excursion might be. And, best of all, these types of hodgepodge ATV journeys can be found almost anywhere in the country. In fact, you might just find all the necessary elements of a mixture of hills, valleys, vistas, and gravel paths within a few miles of your own home.


No matter what your personality type, you can rest assured that there is an ATV trail out there for you and never be afraid to go outside your preferred style. Even if you’re a hard-and-fast “pleasure potpourri” four-wheeling lady or gent, you just might discover that you actually harbor a secret love of “twisting and wild” ATV paths. You’ll never know until you try, so get out there and start exploring!.

Whether you are a veteran of the ATV trail or a novice rider itching to explore the great outdoors on your four-wheeler, you need to bring with you more than a little good sense and safety precautions. Without a significant amount of awareness when it comes to protecting yourself and your ATV, you could wind up injured, lost, or otherwise in bad shape.


First, it’s essential that you bring a helmet with you. In many places, it’s the law. Of course, there might not be other people for a hundred miles except you and your riding companions, so your initial thought process might suggest the opposite. Unless you’re a top-notch prognosticator or have access to a 100% accurate crystal ball, that kind of thinking is as risky as gambling on a horse with a lame leg. It is always better to err on the side of caution and wear a protective helmet when you ride on the ATV trail.


Next, remember the adage, “Drinking and driving don’t mix”? It goes for ATVs as well as automobiles, motorcycles, and boats. Even one beer has the ability to render you in a state of slowed responsiveness… and that means that a wrong turn could be the last one you ever make. Save the alcoholic beverages for the celebratory dinner or party the night after a long day of ATV trail cruising.


Make sure you consider using the “buddy system”. Though there are plenty of ATV enthusiasts who head out into the mountains with nary a friend save their trusty four-wheeled playmates, it is typically not a good idea. The thinking behind this safety precaution is a reasonable one: if anything happens to you on the ATV trail, having someone else there will speed up the process of getting you to a medical facility.


Of course, it’s imperative that you have your cell phone on you for your ATV rides, though you cannot always rely on it unless you have a good connection rate. Without a cellular phone, you could find yourself off a trail in no time and without a clue as to how to get in contact with anyone reliable to help you out.


If you’re exploring a new ATV trail, bring along an updated map of the area. In fact, you might want to get a couple of them and make sure both you and your riding buddies each have one. Sure, it’s not supposed to be cool to say, “Let’s look at the map,” but it’s a lot better than shivering along a remote ATV trail at midnight, wondering how in the world you will make it back.


It’s also important that you turn on the local weather station by the use of the radio or a television before taking a four-wheeler spin. Though most ATVs are built to handle some tricky conditions, it’s best to know what kind of elements you’re likely to encounter. That way you can dress appropriately, bring along suitable gear or leave the ATV riding for another day if conditions look especially dicey.


Finally, one of the most important safety precautions is to ensure that the operator of the ATV is healthy enough to navigate through the trail. If you’re feeling at all ill or have a physical injury that could prevent you from being a dependable driver, you may need to head out another time. There is no shame in postponing an ATV ride if you’re under-the-weather. And, besides, it’s unlikely that you’ll be able to enjoy the experience to its fullest if you’re coughing, achy, or in pain.


By being prudent, you can ensure that your next ATV trail adventure is exciting, rewarding, and, most of all, Safe.

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